Thursday, August 18, 2016

Basic Soccer Rules

Despite being a sport with roots reaching out to medieval and even ancient times, soccer was never really played under a set of strict rules until 1863.

On 26 October, 1863 several amateur and semi-professional clubs from England gathered up in London and formed up the Football Association and devised a "constitution" for the game, including a set of standardized soccer.

Obviously the "Laws of football" as they were called back then were just a set of basic soccer rules and they didn't cover all aspects of the game.

The main points covered by the Football Association were regarding violence on the pitch, as oftentimes the tense clashes in no-rules matches lead to bloody fistfights between the teams. Since then, soccer rules constantly evolved and began covering more and more of the game's principles and also adapting soccer to the age it was played in.

A simple example of this would be the offside rules which was introduced later on in the game, when matches became more and more tactical.Without the offside rule, attackers would often have a hibernating role in the team, simply staying up front and waiting for the ball to come, hence with the new rule, they were forced to work as much as the other players on the pitch.

Let's take a look at some of the official soccer rules of today and give them a small explanation for why they are there and how they affect the game:

Soccer field dimensions - since not all soccer pitches could share the exact same size, FIFA decided a small length and width size threshold in order for a pitch to be playable. So the minimum length of a soccer field must be of 100 yards (90 meters), whereas the maximum length must be 130 yards (120 meters).

A bigger size difference was allowed for the width, which can be as small as 50 yards (45 meters) and as big as 100 yards (90 meters). You might have noticed that the minimum length coincides with the maximum width! Although strange indeed, soccer could actually be played on a square field, however for entertainment's sake no one built that kind of pitch yet (thankfully).

Number of players - The official soccer rules book states that each team can enter the field with 11 players (one of which is the goalkeeper).

The number of substitutes depends on the competition the match is played in, but in official FIFA matches the number of substitutes can range from none to 7, with 3 substitutions eligible for each of the two teams.

However, in friendly matches, it's often the case that both teams agree upon a set number of substitutions or simply go all-out and allow every bench player to get in the game at some point, replacing one of the first team members.

Ball in/out play soccer rules - The ball is in play whenever the referee doesn't intervene whistling a game stop and whenever it stays inside the play area.

If the ball crosses the goal line or touch line by more than half its circumference, then it goes out of play and a goal kick/corner or throw in is given to one of the teams (the opposition of the team that last touched the ball). If a ball hits the referee ,the corner flag, the goal post or any other object on the pitch, the game remains in play.

Fouls - Fouls are one of the most problematic soccer rules nowadays, since they can be easily misjudge or interpreted by the referee, which often causes arguments on and off the pitch. Theoretically, a foul is whistled and a direct or indirect kick is given when a player trips, kicks, pushes, punches, charges or holds an opponent.

However, in the fast pace of the game, it's often hard for the referee to see if a tackle touchesthe feet of the attacker or the ball. It's considered a foul even if the defending player doesn't touch the attacker at all, but has a dangerous intervention such as a high kick.

Goals  - Last but not least, the essence of soccer rules and the object of the game itself, the goal. In order to score a goal, the attacking team must pass the ball beyond the other team's goal line. The attacker can kick the ball, head the ball or push it in with any other body part other than the hand (in which case it is considered handball).

Not all shots that end up in the net are goals though, as a goal can be cancelled if it was scored after the attacker broke one of the other soccer rules, such as fouling a defender or the goalkeeper, using his hand to control the ball, being offside or scoring directly from an indirect free kick.

These are the basic soccer rules and although there are a few smaller twists to learn, if you manage to understand these, you'll be able to watch, and understand a soccer match without problems. Outside the offside rule the other official soccer rules are quite easy to grasp.
 

About the Author.

Niv Orlian is the author and the owner of a Soccer Fans website that provides information on various topics related to soccer such as the history of soccer, soccer rules, famous soccer players , soccer fundamentals and soccer conditioning.

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Success Lessons From Soccer - How To Win or Lose In The Game Of Life

Soccer matches are all about scoring goals and being winners. As a result, soccer can hold up a mirror to life since many humans also want to achieve goals and to be winners in the game of life. There is much to be learned about life in general from soccer players, managers and commentators.

When you listen to commentators on soccer matches, the key words they use again and again when teams are winning are words about character and attitude like belief, excitement, confidence, effort and so on. Soccer skills and strategies are important but mean little without the right attitude. Team managers urge their players to show focus, determination and maximum effort. They tell them they should expect to win and not to show too much respect for their opponents no matter how famous they are. 

I love listening to the comments of the great soccer managers. They have all been to hell and back. They are praised and popular when their teams win. They are criticised and even sacked when their teams fail to win. They know the heights of elation and the depths of despair. They have to find ways to deal with both and to keep motivating their teams to win. Gordon Strachan took over as manager of Celtic, one of the top two clubs in Scotland, in 2005. It was not long before he experienced "the worst night of my life" Bratislava beat Celtic 5-0 in the Champions league, the top European competition. 

His watch stopped after the match and he still wears it to remind himself that it was the worst night of his life. Celtic, the pride of Scotland, had been humiliated by a less famous team. Other failures seemed small to him by comparison. We can all learn to deal with difficult situations by reminding ourselves of worst situations in our past or by imagining how much worse our lives could be than they actually are. None of us knows for sure what will happen to us tomorrow. We could be seriously ill or even dead. 

Gordon has faced this possibility already. He told the media that on his gravestone he would like these words carved: "This is better than that night in Bratislava." He uses the humour of exaggeration to deal with the criticisms of the media when things go wrong. A reporter commented when his team lost a match in Scotland: "Bang, there goes your unbeaten run. Can you take it? " "No," said Strachan. "I'm just going to crumble like a wreck. I'll go home, become an alcoholic and maybe jump off a bridge. Hmmm….

I think I can take it, yeah." He knows the importance of positive thinking if you wish to achieve success. One reporter foolishly asked: "There's no negative vibes or negative feelings here?" Strachan replied: "Apart from yourself, we're all quite positive round here. I'm going to whack you over the head with a big stick; down negative man, down." Strachan often speaks with disarming honesty and schoolboy cheek. He is ready to admit that he and his players are not always at their best. He is ready to face reality. 

Facing up to reality is a key characteristic of the successful. When he managed a team in England, a reporter asked him: "So, Gordon, in what areas do you think Middlesbrough were better than you today?" Strachan replied: "What areas? Mainly that big green one out there...." Strachan has had his defeats but recently he has led his latest team, Celtic, to undisputed victory in the Scottish Premier League. He is widely accepted as a great manager. Another great manager now works in the English Premier League. He is Jose Mourihno, the manager of Chelsea. 

He came to England in June 2004 and soon showed his confidence in himself and his players. He wants only to be judged by the results. A good manager wins. A bad one loses: "I'm not a defender of old or new football managers. I believe in good ones and bad ones; those that achieve success and those that don't. Please don't call me arrogant, but I'm European champion and I think I'm a special one" He soon proved himself to be a 'special one' in England as well as in Portugal, his native country. 

As the name 'the special one' suggests he believes in himself in a big way. A key factor in his success in England is his self-belief and a rich Russian backer who allows him to buy the best players in Europe. You can safely bet money that Chelsea will win almost all their matches. The odds are not great but you could put £100 on Chelsea to win and make an easy £26 from your bet. Of course, this does not always work out. No team is perfect! Mourinho is passionate about soccer but retains his sense of perspective and humour. Recently he was asked in London if he was concerned about losing the championship to his main rivals, Manchester United. His reply was typical of him: "No, I'm more concerned about bird 'flu."

The assembled press started laughing. "Seriously; it's that swan in Scotland that concerns me. It's not that far from here!" (The swan was the first creature with bird 'flu in the UK in 2006) Over the last few weeks, his team, Chelsea, have been criticised for having players sent off for breaking the rules. When Jose was asked about his success away from home against West Brom, he commented ironically: "Maybe we won because we played with ten men. That is our best tactic at the moment." However, he realises that the main reason Chelsea win so often is as follows:

"We have top players and, sorry if I'm arrogant, we have a top manager." Public confidence is so rare in the UK that it is often mistaken for arrogance. Jose does not believe in having favourites; he believes in the power of the team rather than the individual: "I don't want special relations with one of them (his players). I hate to speak about individuals. Players don't win you trophies, teams win trophies, squads win trophies." Another great manager is Harry Redknapp of Portsmouth. He commented about his players in a match with Burnley which ended in a 2-2 draw: "When the crowd was on their backs no one wanted to try anything in case they got booed. They were defensive and wanted to avoid mistakes." 

Harry understands human psychology. If we are too worried about appearing foolish or making mistakes we will fail to make things happen and we will not make full use of our abilities. We go into our shells and play safe. I remember feeling like this when I played cricket at school. I tried to avoid being anywhere near the ball in case I dropped a catch. It was many years before I realised that I was quite good at catching! A commentator remarked: "Harry knows how to get his teams going and how to restore their confidence. Now they expect to win at Fratton Park (the Portsmouth ground). They firmly believe they will win." Recently they have won three games in a row and are on their way to escaping relegation to a lower division. 

Another manager, Stuart Pierce, of Manchester City also knows the importance of confidence: "We need to go out and really believe we can play a bit." What key success lessons can we learn from the above? Skill is important but attitude is even more important. We should expect to win and not show too much respect for the obstacles in our path whether they are human or otherwise and whether they are real or imaginary. We need to believe in our own ability and expect to win even if this makes us seem arrogant. 

We should handle failures by reminding ourselves that things could be much worse. Retaining our sense of humour also helps. Teamwork is a key factor in many types of achievement. We should not be worried about making mistakes whether we are playing soccer or cricket or the game of life. We need to face up to reality and be willing to be judged by the results we achieve as well as the effort we put in. On the whole, I think, that the effort we expend is more important. We cannot always control the results but we can control the effort we put in. 

The same manager can lose with one team and win with another. He is still the same person and he still made the same efforts. I'll leave you with a final quote from Gordon Strachan who has been both a winning and a losing manager: A reporter asked: "Gordon, can we have a quick word?" "Velocity"Psychology Articles, replied Gordon as he walked off. About the author John Watson is an award winning teacher and fifth degree black belt martial arts instructor. He has recently written several books about achieving your goals and dreams. One of these can be found here http://www.motivationtoday.com/36_laws.php

 

Friday, August 5, 2016

How to Learn Soccer Tricks

Let’s face it, even if you’re not much of a soccer player, knowing how to handle a few soccer tricks can mean a world of difference in your friends circle. Improving on your soccer tricks and skills isn’t just for impressing your friends and the ladies though. They can also get your match performance to a higher level, because they’re surprising and effective.

I can give you a lot of examples on that part: remember when Ronaldinho first started to perform his famous Elastico move? (flicking the ball with his outside of the foot to the left, then quickly cutting it with his inside) Nowadays, a defender that’s facing Ronaldinho in a one versus one duel will surely be careful against this move, but when the Brazilian had just invented it, it was extremely surprising and he managed to create havoc whenever his Elastico would work.

I’m not saying you’ll be able to perform as well as Ronaldinho after you learn soccer tricks like that, but it can definitely give you a surprising edge in a match situation.

Another great example of soccer tricks and skills that can make a difference is Zidane’s 360 spin. Although it’s a very effective and simple move, it wasn’t until Zizou popularized it that players all over the World actually used it in matches.

So, if you learn soccer tricks, you’ll be able to gain an edge on your opponent, but that probably wasn’t that hard to figure out anyway. The real question is HOW to do soccer tricks and how to learn them correctly. Here’s what I would suggest.

Try to have a step-by-step approach when you learn soccer tricks, categorizing them on difficulty levels. Start with the basic ones, move on to advanced moves and once you get both these categories well under your boot, try out those special few that are extremely hard to master.

Obviously, if you’re practicing these moves by yourself, or with the help of a friend, you’ll be able to perform them with no or little resistance, which is rarely the case in a real match (and if there’s no resistance, why would you perform them in a match anyway?). So besides practicing the actual move, you’ll also have to work on the timing of your soccer tricks and skills.

A couple of basic moves could include: the Zidane 360 spin, the stop and go, the Puskas V-move or the fake shot dribble.

Under the advanced category, you could try the Cruyff move, the stepover and double stepover or the Scotch.

Moves that are quite difficult to master and are better off left for last, include: Ronaldinho’s Elastico move, the “Brazilian” rainbow move or the Van Persie sweep.

Start off with the basic ones and practice them thoroughly, until you feel you’ve mastered these soccer tricks. Of course, when you move on to the advanced moves, these will take a lot longer to get a solid grip over, but you will have had already built some basic ball control skills from the basic dribble.

More difficult dribbles like the Elastico, or the rainbow kick will take a while to get a grip on, but don’t get discouraged if you keep failing on executing them! With enough practiceFree Reprint Articles, there’s no trick that you won’t be able to handle. The only thing that kills learning a specific trick is saying “I can’t do this” and cutting it off your list.

 

Soccer: The sport that binds the world

Are you a die hard soccer fan? The history of the game should be registered in the mind of even the youngest of "want to be" great soccer players.

Soccer is famous among the layman by the name of ‘Football’. The term ‘Soccer’ has been derived from the word ‘assoc’ that in turn originated from ‘Association’. The game is basically about ‘playing ball with the foot’.

Today, football is played at a professional level all over the world, and millions of people regularly go to football stadium to follow their favourite team, whilst billions more watch the game on television. Since, soccer evokes great passions and plays an important role in the life of individual fans, local communities, and even nations; it is therefore often claimed to be one of the most popular sports in the world.

The game of soccer, played between two teams of 11 players each, is by far the most popular sports in the world. The game is played with a ball on a rectangular grass field with a goal at each end of the field. The object of the game is to score by manoeuvring the ball into the opposing goal. The team that scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. A game is officiated by a referee, who has "full authority to enforce the Laws of the Game in connection with the match to which he has been appointed" and whose decisions are final. The referee is assisted by two assistant referees. A standard adult football match consists of two periods of 45 minutes each, known as halves. There is usually a 15-minute "half-time" break between halves. The end of the match is known as "full-time."

The contemporary history of soccer dates back to more than 100 years. It all began in 1863 in England, when rugby football and association football branched off on their different courses and the world's first football association was founded - The Football Association in England. Both forms of football have a common base and both have a long and intricately branched ancestral tree. After the English Football Association, the next oldest are the Scottish FA (1873), the FA of Wales (1875) and the Irish FA (1880). Strictly speaking, at the time of the first international match, England had no other partner association against which to play. The spread of soccer outside of Great Britain, mainly due to the British influence abroad, started slow, but it soon gathered momentum and spread rapidly to all parts of the world and today it is an undeniable truth that the game has die-hard fans all over the globe.

Scholars might have conflicting views on the origins of the game and the influences that certain cults may have had on its evolution, but one thing is absolute truth: football has flourished for over a thousand years in diverse rudimentary forms, in the very region which we describe as its home, England and the British Isles.

Football is governed internationally by the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA). The most prestigious international football competition is the World Cup, held every four years. More than 190 national teams compete in qualifying tournaments within the scope of continental confederations for a place in the finals. Since 1900, Summer Olympic Games also holds a football tournamnet. After the World Cup, the most important football competitions are the continental championships, which are organised by each continental confederation and contested between national teams. These are the European Championship (UEFA), the Copa América (CONMEBOL), African Cup of Nations (CAF), the Asian Cup (AFC)Psychology Articles, the CONCACAF Gold Cup (CONCACAF) and the OFC Nations Cup (OFC).
 

Six Disadvantages of Soccer

Although playing game is a healthy activity that keeps a person physically and mentally fit, but there are also many minus points. Soccer has too... Soccer is a game that requires great physical activity and stamina hereby improving ones cardiovascular activity, but at the same time injuries come during playing soccer or due to exhausting activities are serious and can induce one to quit the game for good. 

Here are some disadvantages one may face as a soccer player:

1.       Injuries

One can get his knees or ankles wrenched. If two players try to head the ball at the same time they can have their head collision to each other. Kicks can also cause serious fracture, even death too. One can build up flat feet or can have his\her growth plates broken. As in soccer everyone is trying hard so hit and can be strong enough to knock the other person down.

2.       Disadvantages as a Team Sport

In team sports, one has to work and take decisions after confirming that everyone is agreed upon it. Otherwise, there are some pathetic incidents in soccer live games that happened just because of conflict in arguments or everyone is not agreed upon something. Once, Elisha Banda was tortured very poorly by his team members because he decided to play with another team. So, one has to show patience and understanding with his\her team.

3.       Confidentiality Problems

Well, if you are famous and have a representation of a star to the world you have to answer to a lot of people because you have become their inspiration. Same is the case with a soccer player. As a soccer player you will get respected, but media and fans will never leave you alone and your privacy will be endangered.

4.       Health Issues

It is seen that soccer player may suffer some neurological disorders like dementia later in their career.  Older players mostly develop symptoms of depression that can be because of the other factors that affect the game.

5.       Individual’s Talent

Some players may play fine than other soccer live players. For example, they can handle ball in a better way than others and so on. Obviously, they play a very important part in game, whereas others may not get equal opportunities to learn and improve their skills on soccer field. This creates a difference on ranking. Sometimes the game seems to be depending on extra ordinary skilled players only.

6.       Career

Unlike those who play soccer as a hobby one may choose soccer as his\her professional career. This requires you to be very active, fast and healthy. Even minor physical disabilities can keep you away from soccer. Your muscles and all internal parts need to be very tough. To keep yourself in a healthy state you need good nutrition and a careful diet plan all the time.

Above-mentioned disadvantages can be minimized through little care. Besides these disadvantages, soccer has many advantages related to health as well. SoArticle Submission, one may not avoid soccer.